Annie Goetzinger

Following her studies specialized in fashion drawing, Annie Goetzinger was soon published in Circus, L'Echo des savanes, Fluide Glacial, Métal Hurlant and, most of all, Pilote magazine. Her first full comic, "Casque d'or" (1976 Glénat), won her two prizes at Angoulême festival. After that she illustrated "Auroure, une vie de George Sand" (Éditions des femmes, 1978), scripted by Adela Turin, and "Felina" (1979 Glénat), for Victor Mora. She then started her activities in costume design for the theater, illustrations, short stories (for the Fripon collection at Humanoïdes associés) and press drawings, often for Le Monde. She started a highly fruitful collaboration with Pierre Christin in 1980, with "La Demoiselle de la Légion d'honneur" (Dargaud). The pair went on to produce "La Diva et le Kriegsspiel" (1981 Dargaud), "La Voyageuse de la petite ceinture" (1985 Dargaud), "Charlotte et Nancy" (1987 Dargaud), "Le Tango du disparu" (2008 Métaillé), "Le Message du simple" (1994 Le Seuil), "La Sultane blanche" (1996 Dargaud, "The White Sultana" 2016 Europe Comics) et "Paquebot" (1999 Dargaud). Goetzinger and Christin continued for many years to work together on the "L'agence Hardy" series (Dargaud). After releasing the last album of the "Portraits souvenirs" collection (1992 Les Humanoïdes associés, "L'Avenir perdu"), with Jon S. Jonsson and Andreas Knigge, Annie Goetzinger paired up with Rodolphe on the script for "Marie-Antoinette, la reine fantôme" (2011 Dargaud). In 2016 Goetzinger released another graphic novel based on a legendary life: "Jeune fille en Dior" (Dargaud), a work retracing the steps of the man who would one day be one of the world's most famous fashion designers.