Sylvain Savoia

Sylvain Savoia and Jean-David Morvan both grew up in Reims, and discovered comic books together through avidly following the fanzine "Hors Gabarit." In 1989, they both signed up to Saint-Luc art school in Brussels. Over the next three years of training, Savoia worked with Zygus magazine and published some drawings in Jet, a monthly publication founded by Le Lombard, open to new artists. In 1993, Savoia published his first album, "Reflets perdus," with Zenda publishing and Morvan on the script. This little publishing house was soon after bought by Glénat. Savoia brought Phillipe Buchet into the team, a former artistic director of a communications agency specialized in comics. Savoia and Buchet worked together on the artwork of the first two albums of the "Nomad" series ("Mémoire vive" in 1994 then "Gai Jin" in 1995), again written by Morvan. Savoia later illustrated the following three albums ("Mémoire morte", "Tiourma", "Mémoire cachée", from 1996 to 2000 with Glénat), but this time by himself. To ensure the consistency of their output, Morvan, Buchet, and Savoia opened Studio 510 TTC in Reims in 1994. Illustrator Tranktat and colorist duo Christian Lerolle and Franck Gureghian, nicknamed the 'Color Twins', joined them at the studio. Alongside his work on the "Nomad" series, Savoia worked regularly on advertising products, posters, corporate communications and professional training books. In 2003, he and Morvan started the crime series "Al'Togo" with Dargaud. The next year his partner, Sowa Marzena, asked him to illustrate an autobiographical work on her childhood memories of Poland. He developed a whole new graphic style for the series, the first volume of which was published by Dupuis in 2004. After the international success of "Marzi," Savoia brought his readers yet another magnificent lesson in humanity with "Les ésclaves oubliés de Tromelin" (2015 Dupuis, 2016 Europe Comics, "The Forgotten Slaves of Tromelin"). Savoia produced this book after having been invited to participate in a month-long expedition to Tromelin. The book flits between the tragic history of Tromelin Island from the perspective of a young slave girl, and Savoia's own experience on the island during the archeological excavation.